Thursday, March 12, 2020

Free Essays on Prohibition Of Underage Drinking

Dear Mothers Against Drunk Driving, As you know, alcohol abuse is a major concern to everyone, one that requires extensive problem-solving ideas to fix. However, this is not as problematic in non-temperance nations (nations in which the consumption of alcohol is not restricted). According to a survey conducted by Doctor Stanton Peele, an alcoholism and addiction expert, while the consumption of alcohol is greater in non-temperance nations (10.8 litres consumed per capita per annum compared to 6.6 in temperance nations in 1990), the number of AA groups per million persons is drastically lower (25 to 170), as well as the coronary mortality (deaths per 100,000 population), which comes to 272 in non-temperance nations in 1990, compared to the almost double in temperance nations, 421. (Peele) I propose that, in order to reduce alcohol abuse in the United States to a level equal to Italy, France, Spain, Switzerland, Denmark, Luxembourg, and many other non-temperance nations, the U.S government should remove the federal la w which prohibits citizens under the age of twenty-one years old to drink alcoholic beverages. If this is done, young adults will feel less rebellious about alcohol. As well, if the drinking age was removed, parents would be able to teach their children how to drink responsibly, to avoid the suddeness of a person's "legal age." By doing this, the nation as a whole can begin to recognize that it is not alcohol, but the abuse of alcohol, that is the true problem. Making something illegal does not stop teenagers from doing it. In fact, because of their rebellious nature, teenagers are more likely to do something if it is illegal. In 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment, more commonly known as the Prohibition Act, made it illegal to import, export, transport, manufacture, or sell any alcoholic drink with a percentage of alcohol exceeding .5 (Pohelek 2). It had been hoped that the prohibition of alcohol would lower t... Free Essays on Prohibition Of Underage Drinking Free Essays on Prohibition Of Underage Drinking Dear Mothers Against Drunk Driving, As you know, alcohol abuse is a major concern to everyone, one that requires extensive problem-solving ideas to fix. However, this is not as problematic in non-temperance nations (nations in which the consumption of alcohol is not restricted). According to a survey conducted by Doctor Stanton Peele, an alcoholism and addiction expert, while the consumption of alcohol is greater in non-temperance nations (10.8 litres consumed per capita per annum compared to 6.6 in temperance nations in 1990), the number of AA groups per million persons is drastically lower (25 to 170), as well as the coronary mortality (deaths per 100,000 population), which comes to 272 in non-temperance nations in 1990, compared to the almost double in temperance nations, 421. (Peele) I propose that, in order to reduce alcohol abuse in the United States to a level equal to Italy, France, Spain, Switzerland, Denmark, Luxembourg, and many other non-temperance nations, the U.S government should remove the federal la w which prohibits citizens under the age of twenty-one years old to drink alcoholic beverages. If this is done, young adults will feel less rebellious about alcohol. As well, if the drinking age was removed, parents would be able to teach their children how to drink responsibly, to avoid the suddeness of a person's "legal age." By doing this, the nation as a whole can begin to recognize that it is not alcohol, but the abuse of alcohol, that is the true problem. Making something illegal does not stop teenagers from doing it. In fact, because of their rebellious nature, teenagers are more likely to do something if it is illegal. In 1920, the Eighteenth Amendment, more commonly known as the Prohibition Act, made it illegal to import, export, transport, manufacture, or sell any alcoholic drink with a percentage of alcohol exceeding .5 (Pohelek 2). It had been hoped that the prohibition of alcohol would lower t...

Tuesday, February 25, 2020

Internet Impacts the Mental Health of its Users Negatively Essay

Internet Impacts the Mental Health of its Users Negatively - Essay Example Critics admit that the Internet communication has a negative impact on mental health of its users because of impersonal nature of messages and increased time spent by users in front of their PCs (Barnes, 32). Thesis Americans are overly dependent to the Internet because they cannot imagine their life without online communication; without these devices many people become helpless and vulnerable in modern world. The Internet communication has a negative impact on mental health of users because of online phobias experienced by many users. People constantly need to communicate in order to support goal-directed behavior, problem solving, and decision making. Once again, these personal aims and individual needs are reflected in the questions that the Internet users ask as they complete tasks. On the other hand, the goals and communication needs of a person are central to any device that explains question generation. The introduction of computer-based shopping via the Internet provides manufacturers with a cheap and effective way of reaching their customers directly. As the technical problems are overcome, and the issues about the security of transactions and money transfer are resolved, it seems likely that direct selling from the manufacturer will grow exponentially. In spite of great benefits andopporuntities proposed by online communication, it ad... eplace existing channels of communication (such as providing a website that looks) but from exploiting the virtual possibilities that the Internet brings to add value to communication. The Internet connects people from different geographical areas and allows them to communicate faster than any time before. While the population that can be addressed by conventional physical sales and marketing is constrained by geography, that of the Internet is constrained by the number of people who both have access to it and make active use of it (these not necessarily being the same thing). Estimates of the number of people who use the Internet vary widely, although a consensus seems to be emerging that currently tens of millions of people do indeed use the Internet. What there is no disagreement about is the type of people who use the Internet. At the moment (and this will change as the user-base of the Internet expands), they are predominantly young, under the age of about 40, male and relativel y wealthy (Barnes, 65). "Depression was found to be an independent psychiatric symptom factor that influenced Internet addicts compared with intermittent addicts when the demographic and Internet-related factors were adjusted for" (Hall and Parsons 165). Modern society overly depends to the Internet paying more attention to advantages and opportunities of these technologies rather than its harmful and negative impact on their lives. The Internet works with primary causes of change as the basis for creating new tactical options dependable to anticipated environments. The Internet concept withstands new social changes. It provides efficient performance under all likely environments to enable flexible modification to coming changes. Thus, dependency on technology results in powerlessness and

Saturday, February 8, 2020

Estelle v. Gamble Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1500 words

Estelle v. Gamble - Essay Example tates of America have been stained with cases of disparity and discriminatory malpractices while handling criminal cases, judgements and corrections respectively (Teitelbaum & Wilensky, 2009). The case of Estelle v. Gamble, however, hovered on top of the later substance, which indeed, marks the end of the procedure for dealing with crime. It is meant to implement correctional duties but not to inflict pain or act in an extra-judicial manned upon the prisoners. The inhumane behaviour that inflicted extreme medical torture and emotional suffering on Mr. Gamble while he was incarcerated could, therefore, finally cause an intense court case that ensured progressive alteration in the corrections departments of the United States of America. The hands-of-doctrine had concentrated thoughts on the correctional law in United States during the nineteenth century. The United States courts had regarded prisoners as â€Å"state’s slaves) and many judges believed that inmates had no rights given that they had been forfeited because of their crimes. Therefore, they did not interfere with the actions of correctional institutions since they believed that would constitute a violation of the principle of separation of power. In perspective, they did not want to intervene in the affairs of the authority of the executive branch that administer prisons. This is where the case of Estelle v. Gamble had created the greatest noticeable change, and they came to acknowledge that the courts had the right and duty to find resolutions over the constitutional claims of prisoners. The BOP (Federal Bureau of Prisons), had created a handbook in a bid to change the prisons system in a manner that would ensure healthy standards of living was created to be responsible for confining offenders in correction institutions that are humane, safe, secure and cost-efficient. As part of their duties, they are responsible for delivering necessary healthcare to prisoners in accordance with proper and reasonable

Thursday, January 30, 2020

Are Emotion and Reason Equally Necessary in Justifying Moral Decisions Essay Example for Free

Are Emotion and Reason Equally Necessary in Justifying Moral Decisions Essay In analyzing human behavior and human thought processes it can be said that reason and emotions are always present in each major decision. There is no human being, even the most morally upright or the most unbiased observer can make crucial moral decisions without having to have felt the power of reason and the equally powerful emotions in his mind and body. If Emotion and Reason are taken together and if the proponent of this paper will not be given the freedom to choose one from the other then the answer to the query is no. There is no need to have the combined benefit of emotion and reason to justify a moral decision. But if allowed a free hand one should insist that Reason is necessary in justifying moral decisions. This paper will look into the implications of using Emotion and Reason in matters regarding moral decisions. This will be done by finding out what is the meaning of emotions and reason in the world of epistemology. But even before that there is a need to have a review of epistemology the theories on how human beings acquire knowledge. Background Epistemology is a branch of philosophy that deals with how man attains knowledge. For many the getting of knowledge from reading, observing the external environment and by doing experiments can be taken for granted. But for philosophers it is not simply about getting data and then having the ability to describe what was observed and inferred afterwards. Philosophers are persistent that man knows the exact process and if there is none then one should suspect if there is actual learning that occurred after all. With this in mind it is time to introduce two diverging schools of thought when it comes to epistemology and how man exactly acquires knowledge. The first group of philosophers believes that human beings can get knowledge using pure reason. It is the use of the rationale mind, to think using logic to deduce and infer from what can be observed. It is easy to say â€Å"reason† but it is difficult to explain the actual processes of how man looks at the different pieces of the puzzle and then be able to see the whole picture and finds a pattern or connection. Reason is the man’s secret weapon and allows him to reign supreme in this planet. There is no other creature that can use the harness the awesome power of reason in the same way as a human being. A good example is on how man can deduce that certain plants are edible while others are lethal. It is common knowledge that man learns to distinguish between a tasty snack and a vine of poison by observing animals around him. This is probably the same technique used to discover that the seeds hidden behind the coffee pod are not only edible but also a source of one heavenly drink. Without the ability to reason it would have been impossible for man to realize that there is something in that coffee pod after observing the goat or maybe birds taking a liking for the sweet fruit. Another example of reason is in finding a pattern and consistency in natural occurrences such as typhoons, fruiting seasons, gestation period etc. Using reason man was able to build a system where he can begin to tame nature and enjoy her benefits. He can plant and expect harvest. He can build shelter and expect to be protected by an upcoming storm. Man can also reproduce his kind and even multiply his flocks knowing pretty well that there are certain laws in nature that he can rely upon and all these are possible by unleashing the power of reason. Diverging Stream Another school of thought when it comes to the acquirement of knowledge is called empiricism. The empiricists believe that it gaining knowledge through reason alone is suspect. They argue that reason can be influenced by many factors and they conclude that biases and prejudices can interfere in the process. This is understandable because for thousands of years man has postulated about something and made predictions about the future only to be made a fool at the end. This is because reason has its limits. It is at this point that that man is advised not to jump to conclusions. Empiricists will assert that accurate knowledge is only possible if man avails of his senses. The eyes to use to see and measure; the hands used to grasp and determine shape; the ears to hear and determine sound; the nose for determining smells; and the tongue for taste. Emotions are feelings and better yet it is a reaction that a person can observe after the body and the mind – or the heart – is exposed to certain external factors. For example, a mother sees her baby crying because she had not eaten the whole day. The mother has no money to buy milk and she too begins to cry. Her emotion – can be labeled as sadness – tells her that her mind and body does not agree to the image that she saw which is her poor baby experiencing acute hunger. There is another view of emotions which can be very helpful in this study. There are those who assert that emotions are not only act as messengers that tell a person whether something good or bad has occurred but they can be feelings that propels a person to do what is right even when faced with great odds. Jaggar remarked that, â€Å"†¦it is appropriate to feel joy when we are developing or exercising our creative powers, and it is appropriate to feel anger and perhaps disgust in those situations where humans are denied their full creativity or freedom† (1996, p. 82). A good example of such an occurrence was again given by Jaggar who wrote, â€Å"Certain emotions may be both morally appropriate and epistemologically advantageous in approaching nonhuman and even the inanimate world Jane Goodall’s scientific contribution to our understanding of chimpanzee behavior seems to have been made possible only by her amazing empathy with or even love for these animals† (1996, p. 182). To those who are familiar with Goodall’s case will admire her courage and determination considering that she had to travel to Africa and be removed from the comforts and security of Western society and be immersed in a hostile environment, not with humans but with wild animals. It is a good instance of how emotions guided someone to do something heroic. It is easy to understand what emotions can do to lift ordinary humans to strive for things that exceed his grasp. Emotions can fire-up a person and allow him to go where no one has gone before. The history of the United States is replete with examples where tough moral decisions were justified with the cry for freedom and equality. But there is also a counter-argument that emotions are not needed to do justify moral decisions. Reason alone should be enough to move a person to do what is right. This is because emotions can be subjective. And there is no need to furnish volumes of scientific material to prove that point. Emotions can even be counter-productive when used to analyze tough moral decisions as evidenced from the results of a new study published in Newsweek. According to Wray Herbert – writing for Newsweek (2008): A large and growing number of psychologists now argue that a welter of prejudices are simmering just below the surface of society: prejudices against many ethnic groups, against women, gays, the elderly, and outsiders like the homeless and drug addicts. The big question is whether these unconscious animosities are potent enough to actually shape our actions, to make us do things we ourselves find shameful. A new study suggests that, unhappily, the answer is yes. Conclusion The question whether emotion and reason are equally necessary to justify moral decisions is a double-headed query that should have been simplified by separating emotion and reason; rephrasing it in two separate questions: 1) Is emotion necessary to justify moral decisions and 2) Is reason necessary to justify moral decisions. If this is possible then the proponent of this study will say no to the first and then say yes to the second question. But since the main topic used the phrase equally necessary then the answer is no meaning there is no need to bring both emotion and reason to the process of analysis of the problem and ultimately giving the justification for a moral decision. To clarify what is meant by using emotion in the decision process, one has to revisit the example of Jane Goodall and his work with endangered species, it was her strong feelings of emotions, specifically empathy that allowed her to do so much. Using this understanding of emotion the proponent still cannot endorse the use of emotion to judge a moral case because even with strong emotions one can still be mistaken. An excellent example would be the events that transpired in Germany in World War II. The residents of this nation enthusiastically embraced the idea given by Hitler that Jews deserve nothing but death and suffering. The majority agreed or at least the Nazis agreed that this is fact, even truth and they are responsible for the death of 6 million Jews. If one will go to Germany today and present the same ideas to present day Germans they will surely not react with the same fervor as they did in the time of Hitler but they will recoil in horror. This is a clear example of the subjectivity of emotions and therefore not needed to analyze tough moral issues.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

The Return :: essays research papers

The Return Essay   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The novel The Return, written by Sonia Levitin, is a fascinating novel written to show the oppression that Ethiopian Jews suffer. The Return is about a young Ethiopian Jewish woman named Desta, who, with her immediate family, travels to Israel for freedom. During this journey, her brother Joas is shot and dies, she has difficulty finding the group she is supposed to walk with, and she has to stay in a refugee camp for a short period of time. Finally, she reaches her destination and lives in Israel from then on. There are three main topics illustrated in this novel. Prejudice and its effects, maturing and finding one’s own identity, and joining together to achieve common goals.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Prejudice against Ethiopian Jews plays a big role in the Jews’ lives. For example, early on in the novel, Joas makes Desta realize that Ethiopian Jews are not even allowed to pray aloud. This relates to prejudice and its effects because praying aloud is very important for Jews and taking that away from them is the ultimate form of oppression. Furthermore, the novel explains that Ethiopian Jews are called Falasha (strangers) even though they have lived in Ethiopia for generations and are citizens. This is an example of the prejudice because calling an entire section of the population strangers makes them feel like outsiders. Also, when Desta and her aunt want to sell their pottery, the other Ethiopians pay them an unfair price. The prejudice against Ethiopian Jews is illustrated by the fact that non-Jewish Ethiopians cheat Jewish Ethiopians in commerce. Finally, when Desta and Almaz go to a small town on the way to Israel, the people of the town begin shouti ng at them, â€Å"You are buda, go before we kill you!† The people also refuse to give them food even though they are obviously starving. This episode in the novel shows the racial hatred felt by many against Jews.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  During the journey to Israel, maturing and finding one’s own identity plays a big part in Desta’s and her family’s lives. For example, when Joas is shot, Desta has to take care of her younger sister and lead the way to Israel. This shows maturing on Desta’s part because now she is the one in charge, she is able to take care of her younger sister and get food so that she and her sister do not starve and she never gives up on going to Israel.

Monday, January 13, 2020

Marketing channels Essay

Analyze the Supply and Demand side gaps for LA before the alliance. 2) Based on your analysis in 1), which elements of the distribution channel are ineffective at Laura Ashley before the alliance? 3) Evaluate the decision to enter a strategic alliance from the perspective of both Laura Ashley and Federal Express. What are the real opportunities and risks of this approach? 4) How likely is it that the partnership will succeed over the long term? What will it take for both companies to make it successful? Minolta Case 1) What are the challenges facing Minolta? 2) What do you think of Mr Izuhara’s proposed solution to the grey export problem? 3) Discuss the â€Å"tactical changes† proposed by Mr Kusumoto by considering the implications of each proposed changes for Minolta’s marketing strategy and competitive position. 4) Do you see any other alternatives for solving the grey export problem? HP consumer products Case 1) Describe HP’s current distribution system. 2) What functions and channel flows do the retailers accomplish for HP? 3) What are the benefits which a consumer might obtain via an HP presence on the Internet and the benefits to HP – in particular; is it cheaper to sell on-line? 4) What kind of on-line presence do you think HP should have? Why? Supercuts Case 1) What alternatives does Dave have for resolving the problem with Kevin and Wendy? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each of these alternatives? How would you implement your choice? 2) Analyze the risks and returns of owning a Supercuts franchise in one location. 3) Assuming Dave continues granting new franchises, should he look primarily for large franchisees or smaller ones? For example, should he prefer three franchisees, each with four locations over one twelve-store franchisee for a given area, assuming comparable financial credentials? Why? 4) Assume for discussion purposes that owning locations versus franchising them constitutes a reasonably attractive use of capital. If that capital is available, should Dave move in this strategic direction? Why or why not?

Sunday, January 5, 2020

Are We Illiterate Essay - 1011 Words

Are We Illiterate Literacy throughout history has been defined and redefined nearly as rapidly as new generations emerge. As we tread into the twenty first century, our generation moves to redefine literacy once again. However, unlike generations past, we are taking literacy and rapidly spanning it over new mediums that had been, until recently, unavailable. Advances in technology within the past twenty years have been so immense that the human race has literally packed up centuries of research, data, history and other information and moved it into the digital world, spawning a new necessity to have a general working knowledge of computing technologies. Mainstream society as a whole has concluded and accepted that in the twenty first†¦show more content†¦Since it’s conception in 1962 at MIT and eventual growth through the late 60’s and 70’s2 the internet has grown literally by leaps and bounds. This sudden access to nearly infinite amounts of informatio n has caused society to move towards a more convenient, more abundant source of media to express one’s self with. However, due to it’s rapid growth in popularity, several large populations have been left behind. Even those who did achieve a certain level of competency when dealing with computer applications may find that within as little as one year their knowledge has become superseded, outdated by newer evolving technologies. Thusly, computers and their software have brought an almost burdensome issue along with their immense usefulness: the issue of becoming obsolete. In the past, becoming literate meant, for the most part, that one would remain literate for the rest of one’s natural life (sparing any severe mental trauma). However, becoming literate in the use of computer application software does not ensure that one will remain so for very long. Even the most simplistic of applications, take the word processor for example, have evolved beyond recognition within the past several years. This further complicates our definition of literacy as it introduces the element of time into the very threads of the definition. No longer can one be assured that their literacy will remain intact in this rapidlyShow MoreRelatedThe Human Cost Of An Illiterate Society1048 Words   |  5 PagesAre illiterates just people who exist? Do they just walk around aimlessly, never knowing what to do? â€Å"Illiterates li ve, in more than literal ways, an uninsured existence,† says Jonathan Kozol. In Kozol’s article, â€Å"The Human Cost of an Illiterate Society,† he intensely describes how illiteracy can impact both the illiterate and those surrounding him. There is a tragic human cost for an illiterate society. If people are unable to read, then what can they do? In this case, the least taken-for-grantedRead MoreEssay on Technical Illiteracy and Its Impact on Society959 Words   |  4 Pagesilliteracy â€Å"In a digital age, we must learn how to make the software, or risk becoming the software† by Rush off (Rushkoff). This quotation helps in the paper to support our points against the technical illiteracy and its impact on the society. We are living in the 21st century, we use the benefits of scientific progress, and we consider ourselves civilized people. The future of society is not only to learn new skills, operate a computer, not only become a modern illiterate, but also to make life andRead MoreThe Human Cost Of An Illiterate Society By Jonathan Kozol877 Words   |  4 PagesJonathan Kozol’s essay titled, â€Å"The Human Cost of an Illiterate Society,† he exposes the complications of being illiterate as well as how it affects a person on a social, personal, and financial level. 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Being illiterate affects the qualityRead MoreThe Rights Of A Regular Classroom 4 Of The 28 Kids1123 Words   |  5 PagesEducation Department, 1 in 7 Americans are illiterate. That means in a regular classroom 4 of the 28 kids cannot read or recognize most written words. With the plague of illiteracy, these children grow up hiding their disability and trying desperately to just pass by. When they graduate high school, or at least hit 17 years old, they stop their education and begin searching for jobs to support their families since all members are most likely illiterate as well. However, the jobs they get are menialRead MoreEducation and Privil eges1371 Words   |  6 Pagesthe rights and privileges they get? Should this happen? How is someone determined to be uneducated or uneducated? The word â€Å"uneducated† can have a different meaning depending on the situation. â€Å"Uneducated† in most cases refers to adults who are illiterate, or adults who have not completed high school. â€Å"Susan B. Anthony stated in a 1873 speech that it might be acceptable for the educated to be given more rights and privileges by society than the ‘ignorant’ or uneducated.† This statement of Susan B